STAR-ProBio Bio-based Products Social Sustainability Workshop – IFIB 2018

The Bio-based Products Social Sustainability Workshop was held on the 27th of September 2018 from 11:00 to 13:00, as a side event of the IFIB- International Forum on Industrial Biotechnology and Bioeconomy (https://ifib2018.b2match.io). Social Life Cycle Assessment may involve a broad spectrum of aspects directly affecting stakeholders, encompassing human rights, working conditions, health and safety issues, equity, social responsibility, job creation and participation in society. Therefore, the consideration of stakeholders perspectives, when formulating the most relevant aspects to be included in a social sustainability assessment for bio-based products, is of major importance.

  • 11 stakeholders of different categories (e.g. general society, consumers, producers, NGOs, European projects and researchers) were involved in validating a list of the most relevant social topics and indicators related to bio-based products, which was previously identified by means of two rounds of an in-depth literature review
  • Most of the social topics presented to the stakeholders such as Human rights, Health and safety, Social benefits/ social security, Social acceptability, Contribution to economy and Food security were validated. On the other hand, few were recommended for removal.
  • With reference to the indicators associated to the afore-mentioned social topics, Tests performed to check safety, Quality of information/signs on product health and safety, Management efforts to minimize use of hazardous substances, Compliance with regulations regarding transparency, Publication of a sustainability report, Communication of the results of social and environmental life cycle impact assessment, Certification or documentation about sustainability issues, Land use change, and Local employment produced were top ranked.

Exploring the production of bio-energy from wood biomass. Italian case study.

Sara González-García, Jacopo Bacenetti

The concerns related to the environmental impact related to energy production from fossil fuel are increasing. In this context, the substitution of fossil fuel based energy by bio-energy can be an effective solution. In this study, the production of electricity and heat in Italy in a combined heat and power plant (CHP) based on an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) turbine from wood based biomass both from forest and agricultural activities has been analysed considering four potential alternative scenarios to the current energy status: biomass from very short rotation forestry (VSRF) poplar and willow stands as well as residues from natural forests and from traditional poplar plantations. The evaluation has been performed by applying Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) method and an attributional cradle-to-gate approach has been followed. The expected savings of greenhouse gases emission and fossil fuels demand have been quantified, as well as derived emissions of toxic pollutants and substances responsible for acidification, eutrophication and photochemical oxidant formation. The results have been also compared with the conventional Italian scenario considering the current Italian electricity profile and heat production from natural gas. Among the different scenarios, due to the lower transport distance, the use of biomass from traditional poplar plantation residues shows the lowest impact. The biomass combustion emissions are the main hotspot for several evaluated impact categories (e.g., particulate matter formation, human toxicity). In fact, when the produced bio-energy is compared to the reference system (i.e., electricity produced under the Italian electric profile) the results do not favor bio-energy systems. The results reported in this study support the idea that forest residues would be an interesting and potential feedstock for bio-energy purposes although further research is required specifically with the aim of optimizing biomass supply distances.

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